U3A talk covers artificial intelligence

Don Powis Hall at Settlers Park was full of people who were listening with much interest when Dr David Morrell delivered a talk about the implications of the Fourth Industrial Revolution for medicine last Thursday.

ROBOTICS TALK: Dr David Morrell gave a talk on a number of different topics relating to the Fourth Industrial Revolution in medicine and technology at Don Powis Hall, Settlers Park last Thursday Picture: NTOMBI MSUTU

In his talk he first told people about the history of different revolutions and when it all started, where we are currently, and were we headed as humans and technologically.

“Today I will be covering a topic that is in everyone’s lips. Back in the days humans were hunters, we hunted for food, then agricultural revolution came, after that we the scientific revolution, and that was followed by the industrial revolution.”

“The Fourth Industrial Revolution represents a fundamental change in the way we live, work and relate to one another. It is a new chapter in human development, enabled by extraordinary technological advances commensurate with those of the first, second and third industrial revolutions,” Morrell said.

He also mentioned quite a few geniuses who are behind the inventions of computer science and technology. He mentioned the likes of Charles Babbage, known as the father of computers, who designed the first automatic computing engines. He invented computers but failed to build them. The first complete Babbage Engine was completed in London in 2002, 153 years after it was designed.

“This is to show that computers have always been there and [the idea of] singularity is becoming more popular as the years progress. Ray Kurzweil director of engineering at google once mentioned that singularity will be achieved in 2045. Now my question is should we fear singularity or should we embrace it,” Morrell said.

He spoke further on artificial intelligence, saying that AI will have more impact than electricity as time progresses. It will also have effect on employment as the deep learning of computers now surpasses humans, and machines can now recognise the same patterns human brains can.

“All of this is also affecting our climate badly, and we are likely to have mass extinction by 2050. Insects are also declining at an alarming rate and that also poses a threat to pollination, and that should worry us as humans, because we need nature,” Morrell added.

NTOMBENTSHA MSUTU

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  1. […] Don Powis Hall at Settlers Park was full of people who were listening with much interest when Dr David Morrell delivered a talk about the implications of the Fourth Industrial Revolution for medicine last Thursday. In his talk he first told people about the history of different revolutions and when it all started, where we are currently, and were we headed as humans and technologically. “Today I will be covering a topic that is in everyone’s lips. Back in the days humans were hunters, we […] U3A talk covers artificial intelligence […]

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