Dam levels in Western Cape ‘critically low’

Dam levels remain critically low in the Western Cape‚ in spite of the recent rains in the province‚ said Cape Town mayoral committee member Xanthea Limberg.

Voelvlei Dam during a severe drought in the Western Cape. Picture: ASHRAF HENDRICKS, GROUNDUP

Residents are urged to continue using water sparingly as dam levels currently stand at 25.4% with the last 10% not safe for consumption.

Limberg said that dam levels were very low for this time of year.

With the implementation of level 4B water restrictions in July‚ the City of Cape Town aims to bring down collective water use to 500-million litres a day and 87l/person a day. Currently the collective water use stands at 619-million litres a day.

“Water users must take note that over the past month‚ since 6 June 2017 when dam storage levels were at 19.4%‚ our dam storage levels have only increased by 6%‚” said Limberg.

“We encourage friends‚ neighbours‚ families and colleagues to join efforts and to see how they can brainstorm new ways of saving water to bring water usage down even further to below 87l of water in total per person per day‚ wherever they are. Peer-monitoring could also be a good way to keep motivation levels high.

“Our plans of potentially partnering with the private sector to create a short-term emergency water supply‚ using desalination‚ storm water capture or aquifer extraction‚ are also progressing. Monday was the closing date for responses in terms of the request for information to the private sector which we issued to see how partnerships can help us with our short-term emergency supply schemes. All submissions will be analysed from this week onwards. More information on the submissions received and the future processes will be made available at the appropriate time‚” said Limberg.

The city has assured residents that water remains safe to drink as it is tested in accordance with the most rigorous safety standards.

Petru Saal/Business Day

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